Oberon Show will be hosting the annual chainsaw racing event

BOYS ARE READY: Chainsaw racing steward Shane Ryan with his grandsons Zeb and Lang with the chainsaws. Picture: CIARA BASTOW
BOYS ARE READY: Chainsaw racing steward Shane Ryan with his grandsons Zeb and Lang with the chainsaws. Picture: CIARA BASTOW

With the Oberon Show just weeks away, residents don't have to look far for events that might take their fancy.

One event that is popular with the crowds is chainsaw racing.

Chainsaw racing steward Shane Ryan, who owns over 300 chainsaws and has been competing for the past 15 years is excited to bring the event back to Oberon once again.

"They really do get into it here, I'll get out in front talking and some events I don't go in and just let the other young blokes go in and have a good time," he said.

"I'm usually out there talking, telling everyone what's going on and what the race is because years ago no one ever used to and no-one knew what was going on.

"But yeah it is good fun and I would like to see a few more blokes get back into it."

Mr Ryan said it would be good to see some of the locals come along since there were so many properties and people that owned chainsaws.

"I think the hardest thing is getting blokes to help me get out in the bush and you got to get logs," he said.

Before COVID reared its ugly head, Mr Ryan was attending shows all over the state, including Eglington Show near Bathurst.

"We used to have guys come down from up North off the Coast and we had a couple of blokes from Goulburn way, so that made it really exciting," he said.

"We would get between 22 to 26 cutters, which took a lot of organising but if we could get at least six at Oberon that would be great.

"I bring spare chaps, chainsaw trousers, helmets, but cutters have to have their own covered footwear."

SHOW TIME: All the different classes and models of chainsaws you will find at the show. PICTURE: CIARA BASTOW

SHOW TIME: All the different classes and models of chainsaws you will find at the show. PICTURE: CIARA BASTOW

Mr Ryan also brings a few spare blockbusters as well as the fencing gear and makes that all competitors are six metres away from the crowd.

"Oberon has been pretty good with the prize money, we've got a bit of cash and I've rounded up some oil, gloves, protective glasses, sunnies and WD40," he said.

Mr Ryan said there are different classes, the under 80cc, under 100cc, and over 100cc standard.

"Then we have two saw supplied events, I'll supply the saws and there is a novice saw supplied and an experienced saw supply, the experienced won't go in the novice, that's just for new comers, young blokes that haven't done much cutting and things like that and there is always a spare saw around if someone wants to have a go," he said.

"Then we have an under 100 hot saw, then we have an open hot saw which is over 100 obviously."

Mr Ryan explained that if they have 12 competitors they will run heats but for small shows with only four to six competitors they will do two heats of three.

"When we do get a good crowd there and a lot of cutters, there's a lot of blokes that jump in and help which is good because there's a lot of packing and lifting logs all day and cleaning up," he said.

Mr Ryan who has always worked on the land said he is nearly ready to give it up if someone younger wanted to take over.

"If some other young fella come along that was really interested I'd probably let him have the stands and I'd keep me saws and I could give him a few contacts but if someone wanted to do all the arranging and ringing and checking and stuff I'd probably let him do it," he said.

GEAR UP: Chainsaw steward Shane Ryan with his grandsons Zeb and Lang. Picture: CIARA BASTOW

GEAR UP: Chainsaw steward Shane Ryan with his grandsons Zeb and Lang. Picture: CIARA BASTOW

The men will need to be quick if they want to win by chopping three disks off.

"It depends on the size of the log because your under 80cc is only going to be little but in the open saw it will be harder, but a good open saw could cut three disks in about six to seven seconds," he said.

"Then of course we have a post rip which is a long log about six foot six and we try to get it out of a good hard wood.

"So the guy that supplies the logs can actually keep the posts and use them for fencing.

"So our post rip event is a log that you can cut four posts out of. That's what I bring the spare blockbusters for because you do your cut, turn your saw off and then you're gonna use the blockbuster to bust the post out."

Mr Ryan said the post rip was a really good event and he always tries to make sure there are enough logs for everyone to have a go.

"But if you get 14 guys and you spread them apart because you don't want a collision and they all go at once and you have a dozen under 80s screaming their head off it's good to watch," he said.

Mr Ryan is also good at creating furniture and has made a few nice bench seats in his time.

"I might even bring a special block and cut a soccer ball in the square for the crowd," he said.

Mr Ryan said there is an entry fee of about $5 per event and they will start setting up around 9am for an 11.30-12pm start at the Showground.