Scarecrows will be used to display the Oberon Show spirit

ON SHOW: The 2021 Oberon Show won't be held, but locals can contribute to the show spirit by being part of a scarecrow competition.
ON SHOW: The 2021 Oberon Show won't be held, but locals can contribute to the show spirit by being part of a scarecrow competition.

THE 2021 Oberon Show has been cancelled, but the show society is out to prove that the Oberon show spirit is alive and well.

Oberon Show Society president Glen Stewart said that while necessary, the COVID cancellations of key show events on the social calendar have disappointed organisers, exhibitors and attendees statewide.

"The Oberon Show is so much more than an event - it's a community of volunteers, sponsors, competitors and locals who love attending every year," he said.

"We'll be back with the real show in the future, but in the meantime, we'll make do with our No-Show Scarecrow project."

He said the project, organised by the Agricultural Societies Council of NSW, is in support of all show societies unable to hold their shows.

"The Oberon Show would have celebrated its 121st show in 2021," Mr Stewart said.

"We have three competitions going: a colouring-in competition for our primary school and pre-school children; a household build a scarecrow competition and a shop window display competition. The competition will be judged on Halloween eve.

"Prizes will be awarded in all categories, so watch our Facebook page for more information."

Mr Stewart said this combined action across the state will remind everyone of the strength and resilience of the show movement.

The Agricultural Societies Council of NSW is recommending each show society puts a local spin on its scarecrow and displays it proudly in a prominent location as a reminder that the show will go on and to put a smile on local faces.

Oberon Show Society has built its scarecrow, it's on display at the Oberon Showground and now the challenge is out.

"Can you make a better one? Participants can register their entry via Oberon Show Society's Facebook page," Mr Stewart said.

"Individually, we are just a show, but as a whole, we are the show movement which has been a part of Australian life for well over a century."

Agricultural shows in Australia attract six million visitors annually and the volunteer hours required to run the 660 shows makes the show movement the largest volunteer network in the country.