Aboriginal inmates staying connected through their artwork

PRIDE: Aboriginal inmates at Oberon Correctional Centre with their artwork.
PRIDE: Aboriginal inmates at Oberon Correctional Centre with their artwork.

Oberon Correctional Centre staff have commissioned a group of Aboriginal inmates to create a large mural to help them stay connected to culture during times of social distancing.

Manager of security Stuart Lyle said the group, overseen by case management officer Rachel Ross, were proud to have their artworks permanently installed at the facility.

"The panels represent individual totems, so the inmates were able to connect and discuss their various backgrounds and stories as they painted," Mr Lyle said. "They took great pride in completing the artworks, which are now part of the fabric of the centre."

Bathurst Correctional Centre's Girrawaa Art Centre has donated more art supplies to allow the inmates to continue learning and practicing their craft.

Oberon Correctional Centre is a minimum security facility for males offenders ranging from young adult offenders who complete a Young Offender Program to adult offenders who are actively working towards preparation for their release.

The centre operates a Gurnang Life Challenge Program, a 16-week series of interventions that include self-responsibility, vocational education, work readiness, personal development and dynamic risk. This is an opportunity for inmates to reflect on their situation, cope with new challenges and determine a course of action to become law-abiding adults.