Lots of worries about size at proposed subdivision

CONCERNS: The one-hectare minimum lot sizes of the proposed subdivision at 175 Titania Road superimposed over the much larger lot sizes of the rest of Titania Estate.
CONCERNS: The one-hectare minimum lot sizes of the proposed subdivision at 175 Titania Road superimposed over the much larger lot sizes of the rest of Titania Estate.

THIS (pictured) is the image that resident Sig Sovik says best illustrates his concerns about the density for the proposed subdivision at 175 Titania Road.

The map comes from the Oberon Council business papers from February 2016, according to Mr Sovik, and shows the original lot sizes for Titania Estate (which was subdivided in the 1980s/90s).

It was February 2016 when council approved a one-hectare minimum lot size (MLS) for 175 Titania Road. 

Over the map of the original Titania Estate, Mr Sovik has superimposed the proposed subdivision on the east side of Titania Road at the same scale (the white area). 

"It illustrates how different in nature and density the new proposed subdivision is," Mr Sovik said.  

He says anyone “who lives at, or overlooks Titania Estate appreciates the spacing and privacy of the houses, the retention of extensive tree-cover, and the general country feel of the place and how well it fits in with the rural environment”.

"While Titania Estate was designed with two-hectare minimum lot size, actual lot sizes were adjusted upwards to take account of the topography. The result was a subdivision with 82 lots varying from two hectares to 13 hectares in size and averaging out at more than four hectares per block. 

"In contrast, 175 Titania is designed with 43 lots at an average of 1.6 hectares and presents a very different proposition with apparent scant regard to topography and waterlogging.

"For 175 Titania Road, it will be covenanted that houses must be 300 squares minimum for rainwater capture and have water tanks of 125kl or more. Bores will not be allowed and additional water must be trucked in to meet water needs estimated by DPI Water to be 456kl per year for a four-person household - double the average rain capture.

“The visual impact of 43 homes on small lots will be something to contemplate in the years to come.”

Mr Sovik said council has been asked that a visual impact statement be prepared and exhibited so that Oberon residents can make an informed judgement but “the suggestion has fallen on stony ground”.

"Councillors have the authority to ensure that subdivisions be designed to benefit its residents and contribute to the fulfilment of our vision as a community. 

"This can be done without detracting from a developer’s right to develop his land within the confines of the law."

Mr Sovik said that DPI Water recommended a five-hectare MLS for this land.

"If larger lot sizes are required for the safety of the environment, the visual impact, hydrology or any other relevant issue, councillors have the full power to reject this DA as it stands or have it amended."