Rural Notebook | CTLX comes into its own as dry grinds on

JUST IMAGINE: This could happen if our prayers for rain are really answered. Storms last week brought heavy falls for some.
JUST IMAGINE: This could happen if our prayers for rain are really answered. Storms last week brought heavy falls for some.

LAST Friday’s massive sale at Central Tablelands Livestock Exchange Carcoar was a great effort by all concerned and demonstrated the benefits of a regional saleyard.

To yard almost 13,000 weaner calves in a district that is in the midst of an awful season is a real achievement and one report tells us that a consignment from Bombala was included in the sale. 

The Blue Ribbon weaner sale was held in the old Bathurst Saleyards for some years and established a genuine reputation for quality, and this has obviously transferred to the CTLX regional complex.

The early market reports from agents are quite positive.

Heavy and light

STORMS last week brought falls ranging from 50-odd millimetres in places down to a few drops in many areas and the heavy recordings caused a lot of wash.

Producers who had sown early oat crops are pleased to see the green shoot in paddocks that were looking sad.

The official reading at Bathurst’s main water supply, Chifley Dam, was below 60 per cent before the storms and the run-off into catchment streams will be valuable.

Time of change

SOME follow-up from last week’s comment that “nothing ever changes in the Merino industry”. 

Several leading breeders commented on the disappearance of body wrinkle in many purpose-bred flocks and a lady breeder told me: “I don’t think you could keep a modern shearer in a pen full of un-mulesed, heavy skinned Merino wethers, and you wouldn’t blame him if he left.”

Mention was made that many farmers refer to climate change believers as nutters, and several friends tell me that many environmentalists refer to some farmers as nutters, so we return to square one and still it never rains in many places.

Of course, it is really unusual to be having Indian summer 30 degree days in Bathurst in late April. Much has changed and we must adapt to the changes.

SPEED MACHINE: Andrew Donnelly’s artwork at the Royal Bathurst Show depicted a racing Bentley from the Liqui Moly 12 Hour at Mount Panorama. Andy’s dad is well-known local farrier Nev Donnelly.

SPEED MACHINE: Andrew Donnelly’s artwork at the Royal Bathurst Show depicted a racing Bentley from the Liqui Moly 12 Hour at Mount Panorama. Andy’s dad is well-known local farrier Nev Donnelly.

Great show

THE 2018 Royal Bathurst Show is done and dusted and plans for the 2019 event are already being discussed.

There are lots of favourable comments being made and a little bloke asked me this: “Is the show on again next week?”

Organisers and the army of volunteers all deserve a big thank you for the year-long efforts they put in to showcase all that’s good in the Bathurst district.

I’m sure that the thousands of showgoers say: “Take a bow, Bathurst AH and P.”

Willing workers

CURRENT discussion in the city media on the availability of jobs in the country has focused on part-time and casual work in woolsheds, market gardens and on farms.

The ongoing building boom in cities like Orange and Bathurst has attracted the capable, willing workers from rural work and pay rates have to be competitive for farmers and contractors to source the staff they need.

Quite often the girls who have just left school are quality workers and don’t talk a lot, or lose concentration.

Many employers shy away from would-be workers who carry lots of tattoos or have a don’t-care attitude.

The willing workers are the greatest asset that any business can have; they are the public face of many businesses.

Diary dates

Tuesday, May 1: Kerrs Creek Road, Euchareena, 9.30am-3pm. Pasture and livestock assessment workshop.

Thursday, May 3: Hobbys Yard Road, Barry (South), 9.30am-3pm. Pasture and livestock assessment workshop.

These events are conducted by Central Tablelands Local Land Services and are an opportunity for all producers in the areas to address common dry weather problems with staff and fellow producers.

These days are free, but you must book for location and catering purposes. Contact Brett Littler on 0427 007 398 or brett.littler@lls.nsw.gov.au.

Many thanks to Simone at LLS for providing these details.

Laugh lines

TWO hunters spent days in the mountains and one got a black bear each day, while his mate got none.

“I find a big hole in the mountain, and shout and yell ’til a bear rushes out, and I drill him,” the first hunter said.

Next day, the second hunter was bruised and battered, but didn’t have a bear.

“I yelled and screamed at a huge hole in the mountain and a huge, roaring train came out,” he said.

***

TWO boys aged six and eight were having a sleepover at Grandma and Pop’s place and it was just a week ’til the six-year-old’s birthday.

Early to bed, he said his prayers on bended knee: “God bless Mum, Dad, Aunty Rita, Uncle Fester, both our dogs and Gran and Pop. And for next week’s birthday, I’d love a 50cc Honda bike or a Nintendo and an iPad.”

“There’s no need to yell out your prayers; God’s not deaf,” his brother scolded him.

 “Of course I know he’s not, but Pop’s as deaf as a strainer post,” the little bloke answered.