Opinion: Rural Notebook with John Seaman

GREEN: This photo, taken during AgriWest Bathurst's pasture walk on Peter Denmead’s property, shows brassica that is almost ready for grazing.

GREEN: This photo, taken during AgriWest Bathurst's pasture walk on Peter Denmead’s property, shows brassica that is almost ready for grazing.

MOST landholders who had bothered to enrol to vote in Local Land Services board elections will have returned their ballot forms by now and made their choices.

One candidate suggests that the most costly pest animal in terms of economic losses to primary production is the kangaroo that is in plague proportions across many districts.

I’ve mentioned the candidates concerns to a number of ratepayers and the common answer is: “Why don’t LLS or Department of Primary Industry do something constructive and have kangaroos declared a feral pest animal?”

Vale, Ian Mutton

FAREWELL to popular harness racing trainer/driver Ian Mutton who passed away recently.

He leaves a legion of friends and a store of happy memories and will be greatly missed by all involved in the pacing industry.

Thanks, Margie

A BIG thank you to Margie Gaal and her staff at the city dog pound on Lloyds Road.

Some of our family members (two of them under three) were involved in a nasty accident at the pound corner and Margie and her staff showed them great kindness and a very welcome cuppa.

Much appreciated from our family to all at Margie’s.

Spray success

SEVERAL large scale livestock producers tell me that they have great results with a Nufarm foliar spray named ProGibb 5G. 

The product brochure claims dry matter increase of better than 30 per cent in rye and clover pastures within three weeks of spraying and that four years of trial work show boosts to pasture growth in autumn and early spring.

ProGibb contains gibberellins that stimulate plant growth and these are already naturally in most plants.

The treatments are economic to use: a 250 gram packet costs $195 inclusive and details can be bought from Agriwest or other rural retailers.

Wool report

THE merino wool market faltered slightly this week with all merino microns losing around 30c/kg.

The cross-breds, however, were 5c/kg dearer.

The northern market indicator finished the week on 1615c/kg, down 24c/kg.

With less quantity to choose from and a lower dollar, this fall caught everyone by surprise.

The broader and burry merinos took the brunt of the fall and these wools could get a little cheaper in the coming weeks while the fine wools should hold their ground with very little quantity to choose from.

Mark Horsburgh, TWG Landmark

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